Pliability of the Sex Drive Sociology Help

Pliability of the Sex Drive  

In most species ·the sexual behavior of. all healthy adult males is very much alike, and that of all healthy adult females is very much alike. True, some learning may-be involved. In the wild state th~ "social" animals (those who normally live ~ groups, such as lions, monkeys, and wolves) can learn mating procedures through imitation. When socially deprived, like Harlow's monkeys who had only a cloth-covered wire frame as a substitute "mothe~," many did not mate at all, and manY' who did mate then killed abused, or neglected their children [Harlow, 1961, 1975]. Sheltered house dogs, raised without watching other dogs mate, often must be help«;d in their first mating. But in all solitary species, among which the males abandon the females after the mating period (cats, bears, porcupines, and many others), the young cannot learn to mate through imitation. If sexual' behavior depended upon sociability these . species would be extinct. Thus. am~(\g most _' nonhuman species, sexual behavior is instinctive, is not greatly affected by learning, and is highly uniform-within each speci~s. ' . In stark' contrast, the striking feature of human sexuality is its variability. All human drives are subject to cultural conditioning, and the sex drive spectacularly so. While we assume that an inborn drive makes men and women powerfully attracted to each other, the manner of expressing this attraction shows 'great variation in every detail. Every aspect of human sexual feeling and behavior is culturally patterned and varies .from society to society, from time to time within a society, and from group to group within complex societies. in virtually an sorts of sexual matters, such as who appears desirableness , {slender if a Doberman, plump if a Chihuahua), who makes the overtures (girls in Bali, boys among the Dumbfound), how sex play by pre- , adolescent" children is stewed (With approval among 'the Chews, with censure among the ' Cuba),the view of sexual foreplay (expected as among the Po nape, who may prolong ,foreplay for hours, 0, absent as among the Epochal), where intercourse is proper (in the house as among the Pukka, or in the ' bush as among the Withstood), what positions are :'customary (male above as among the Trobriand, side by 'side as among the Masai, sitting as among the Palau), how the in their first mating. But in all solitary species, among which the males abandon the females after the mating period (cats, bears, porcupines, and many others), the young cannot learn to mate through imitation. If sexual' behavior depended upon sociability\g, these . species would be extinct. Thus. am~(\g most _' nonhuman species, sexual behavior is instinctive, is not greatly affected by learning, and is highly uniform-within each speci~s. ' . In stark' contrast, the striking feature of human sexuality is its variability. All human drives are subject to cultural conditioning, and the sex drive spectacularly so. While we assume that an inborn drive makes men and women powerfully attracted to each other, the manner of expressing this attraction shows 'great variation in every detail. Every aspect of human sexual feeling and behavior is culturally patterned and varies .from society to society, from time to time within a society, and from group to group within complex societies. in virtually an sorts of sexual matters, such as who appears desirableness , {slender if a Doberman, plump if a Chihuahua), who makes the overtures (girls in Bali, boys among the Dumbfound), how sex play by pre- , adolescent" children is  stewed (With approval among 'the Chews, with censure among the ' Cuba),the view of sexual foreplay (expected as among the Po nape, who may prolong ,foreplay for hours, 0, absent as among the Epochal), where intercourse is proper (in the house as among the Pukka, or in the ' bush as among the Withstood), what positions are :'customary (male above as among the Trobriand, side by 'side as among the Masai, sitting as among the Palau), how the female should ad (passive as among the Chihuahua, or' aggressive and vigorous as among the Hopi)-in all, these and, other  respects, we find great variety. 'What we do  and how we feel about it is culturally  patterned. Thus, the Trobriand mother, learning that her daughter is joined in bed by a  boy each night, is pleased that her daughter is developing nicely, but would be horrified to hear that her daughter and-a boy were eating: together=feelings quite the reverse of ,the of the ,traditional American mother. Sex behavior neatly illustrates 'the generalization practically everything is right someplace and catalytic nothing is right everywhere.  Iota and Beach observe:

This list of interesting sexual practices could be extended for many pages. While Mightiness be entertaining, it would be redundant. The examples given abode are sufficient.to make the point that human sexual feelings tomtit behavior are culturally patterned:' Where sex" is concerned, almost everything one can imagine is "right" someplace, is practiced with a dear  conscience and a serene sense of moral propriety by those socialized to view it.so. And practically everything is "wrong" someplace The practice of homosexuality muskrats this generalization.

Posted on September 2, 2014 in SEXUALITY AND SEX ROLES

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