Nursing Homes Assignment Help & Writing Service

Nursing Homes

It sometimes becomes necessary for an older person to move into a long-term-care facility or nursing home as a result of major physical and/or cognitive problems that prevent the person from living in any other setting. There are two types of care provided in nursing homes: skilled care and long-term care. Skilled care provides services that are rendered by a doctor, licensed nurse. physical therapist. occupational therapist, social worker, respiratory therapist. or other specialist. This type of care typically follows a hospital visit and involves short-term nursing care or therapy until the patient can return home. By contrast, long-term care is provided for individuals who can no longer take care of themselves and are likely to remain in the nursing home facility for the remainder of their lifetime (Medicare.gov, 2007).
More than 20,000 nursing homes’ operate in the United States. with a total of more than 2 million beds. Although there ha.~been some downward fluctuation in the total number of people living in nursing homes in recent ,largely due to the availability of home health care options and assisted-living facilities. there are about 2 million nursing home residents today.  Most residents are 85  age or older. with relatively few being younger than age 65. According to analysts. women make up about 72 percent of all residents.

because women have a greater life expectancy than men (60 percent of nursing home occupants are widowed). Women over 80 years of age also have relatively high rates of chronic illness or disability that make it necessary for them to receive assistance with various activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing. walking, and eating (AGS Foundation for Health in Aging, 2007). Some nursing home residents have mental disturbances or have been diagnosed with dementia-a
group of conditions that all gradually destroy brain cells and lead to a progressive decline in mental function. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, and a growing number of nursing home residents have this progressive brain disorder, which gradually destroys a person’s memory and ability to learn new information, make judgments, and communicate with others. Some nursing home facilities are designed exclusively for residents with Alzheimer’s disease because of the physical and behavioral changes (such as personality and behavioral disorders) that typically accompany this condition. Government analysts estimate that about $150 billion is spent annually on nursing home care in the United States and that this figure will continue to rise in the future as more people live to older ages, particularly  if no medical advances are made in the treatment of dementia (Medicare.gov,2007). Nursing home care is paid for in a variety of ways, including Medicare, Medicaid, and long-term care insurance. Medicare pays for skilled nursing or rehabilitative services but typically does not pay for long-term care. Medicaid, a joint state and federal program, pays most nursing home costs for people with limited income and assets if they are in a nursing home facility certified by the government. Some people have long-term care insurance or managed- care plans through their health insurance policies; however, about half of all nursing home residents pay nursing home costs out of their own savings. This expense often has devastating consequences on their finances, and after these savings are depleted, they must turn to Medicaid for their long-term care (Medicare .gov, 2007). As one analyst has suggested, “As result, only the poor elderly receive  assistance through the sate with long-term care. By default, then, the United States has a poverty-based long-term care system” (Harrington Meyer, 1994:9)

How satisfactory are nursing homes in meeting the needs of older individuals? Although there have been  frequent criticisms in the media and lawsuits brought against some nursing homes for problems such asneglect  r mistreatment of patients, there has been a greater emphasis in both the public and private sector on quality care in nursing facilities. Many homes advertise that their health care teams are made up of  highly competent, skilled professionals who work diligently to meet the medical, social, and personal needs  of their residents. However, high staff turnover (about 50 percent every year for professional nurses, for example) makes it difficult to ensure that residents areare receiving quality long-term care in any b>facility. Regulatory changes in the late 1980s mandated that nursing homes must meet specific training guidelines and minimum staffing requirements. However, it often becomes necessary for patients or their families t  check with state regulators to see if a specific facility is meeting these guidelines and to observe for themselves what takes place on a daily basis in the facility. Many nursing homes have adopted codes that specify the rights of residents, including
the right to be treated with dignity and respect; full disclosure about the services and costs associated with living at the nursing home; the right to manage one’s own money or choose the person who will do this; the right to privacy and to keep personal belongings  and property unless they constitute a health orsafety hazard; the right t9′ be informed about one’s medical condition and medications and to see one’s own doctor; and the right to refuse medications and treatments (Medicare.gov, 2007).

gently to meet the medical, social, and personal needs of their residents. However, high staff turnover (about  50 percent every year for professional nurses, for example) makes it difficult to ensure that residents are receiving quality long-term care in any   Regulatory changes in the late 1980s man date dthat nursing homes must meet specific training guidelines and minimum staffing requirements. However, it often becomes necessary for patients or their families to check with state regulators to see if a specific facility is meeting these guidelines and to observe for themselves what takes place on a daily basis in the facility. Many nursing homes have adopted codes that specify the rights of residents, including
the right to be treated with dinity and respect; full disclosure about the services and costs associated with living at the nursing home; the right to manage one’s own money or choose the person who will do this; the right to privacy and to keep personal belongings and property unless they constitute a health or safety hazard; the right t9′ be informed about one’s medical condition and medications and to see one’s own doctor; and the right to refuse medications and treatments (Medicare.gov, 2007).

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