MARITAL CHOICE Sociology Help

MARITAL CHOICE

The process of arranging a marriage shows a fascinating range of possibilities. As shown above, some societies followa formula whereby the children of certain socially designated kinsfolk marry each other, so that the individual choices may be unnecessary.Where. actual choices are necessity they may be made in many ways. The couples can do their own choosing, sometimes with parental guidance or parental veto. The parents can arrange the marriage, with or without considering the couple's wishes. A wife may be purchased, or perhaps a complicated series of gifts are exchanged between families. Wife. capture is not unknown. Each of these patterns is the standard way of arranging marriages in some of the world's societies. An of them work-within the society in which they exist-s-end are supported by the surrounding values and practices of the culture. Wife capture worked very well for the Tasmanian who practiced village exogamy and were not greatly concerned over the differences between one woman and all the others. For our society, it would be less practical. This illustrates the concept of cultural relativism-a pattern which. works well in one cultural setting might work badly in another. As Peters shows [1971], parental engagement of 3-year-old girls to teenaged boys works out very wen for the Shirishana of Brazil, while any attempt to impose the Western concepts of marriage' would undermine Shirishana stability and invite chaos.

Posted on September 3, 2014 in The Family

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