Industrial Societies Sociology Help

Industrial Societies

 An industrial society is one in which factory or mechanized production has replaced agriculture as the  majordomo of economic  activity. As societies industrialize, the status of women tends to decline further. Industrialization in the  noted States created a gap  between the unpaid work performed by women at home and the paid work that increasingly was performed by  men and  unmarried girls (Mott and Matthias, 1996). When families needed extra money, their daughters  worked in the textile mills until  hey married. In 1900, for example, 22 percent of single white women who had been born in the United States were in the paid  labor force. Because factory work was 110th compatible with child-care responsibilities, only 3 percent of married  women were so  employed, and only when they were extremely poor (Mott and Matthias, 1996). As  it became more difficult to make a living by inning,  many men found work in the factories, where their  primary responsibility was often supervising the work of women and   children. Men began to press for a clear division between “men’s work” and “women’s work;’  as well as corresponding pay   differentials (higher for men, lower for women) .

In the United States, the division of labor between men and women in the middle and upper classes became much more distinct  with industrialization. The men were responsible for being “breadwinners”, the  women were seen as “homemakers.” In this new “cult of domesticity” (also referred to as the “cult of true womanhood”), the home became a private, personal sphere in which   omen created a haven for the family. 10se who supported the cult of domesticity argued that women were the natural keepers of   he domestic sphere and that children were the mother’s responsibility. Meanwhile, the “breadwinner” role placed enormous  pressures on men to support their families-being a good provider was considered to be a sign of manhood (Mott and Matthias,  996). However. this  rendered division of labor increased the economic and political subordination of women. As a. result, many white women focused their efforts on acquiring a husband who was capable of bringing home a good wage. Single women  ND  widows and their children tended to live a bleak existence, crowded into run-down areas   f cities, where they were often unable to support themselves on their meager wages.

The cult of true womanhood not only increased white women’, dependence on men but also became a source of discrimination  gains women of color, based  on both their race aim the fact that many of them hat! to work in order to survive. Employed,  irking-class  white women were similarly stereotyped at the same time that they became more economically dependent on their   husbands because their wages were so much lower.

As people moved from a rural, agricultural lifestyle to an urban existence, body consciousness increased.  People who worked in  offices often became sedentary  and exhibited physical deterioration from their lack of activity. As gymnasiums were built to fight  his lack of physical fitness, a new image of masculinity developed. Whereas the “burly farmer” or “robust workman” had  previously been the idealized image of masculinity, now the middle-class man who exercised and lifted weights came to embody  h: .leak (Klein, 1993).  In the late nineteenth CEO :y, middle-class women started to become preoccupied with body fitness. As  industrialization progressed and food became more plentiful, the social symbolism of body weight and size changed.  Previously, it ad been considered a sign of high status As people moved from a rural, agricultural lifestyle to an urban existence, body  consciousness increased. People who worked in offices often became sedentary  and exhibited physical deterioration from their  ack of activity. As gymnasiums were built to fight this lack of physical fitness, a new image of masculinity y developed. Whereas the   burly farmer” or “robust workman” had previously been the idealized image of masculinity, now the middle-class man who  exercised and lifted  weights came to embody the .leal (Klein, 1993). In the late nineteenth CEO :y, middle-class women started to  come preoccupied with body fitness. As industrialization progressed and food became more plentiful, the social symbolism  of body weight and size changed.  Previously, it had been considered a sign of high status

Posted on September 5, 2014 in Sex and Gender

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