Group Experience and Personality Sociology Help

Group Experience and Personality

At the start of life there is no self. There is a physical organism but no sense of person. Soon the infant feels out the limits of its body, learning where its body ends and other things begin. The child begins to recognize people and tell them apart. At first, any man .c; a ‘daddy” and any woman a “mummy,” but eventually the child moves from names which distinguish a status to specific names which identify individuals, including itself. At about the age ‘of 18 months to’ 2 years, the child egins to use “I,” which is a clear sign of a definite self-awareness–a sign that the child is becoming aware of being a distinct human being {Cooley, 1908; Brain, 1936; Kagan, 1981]. With physical maturation and the accumulation of social experiences, the child forms an image of the kind of person he or she is an image of self. One ingenious way of trying to get some impression of a person’s self image is the “Twenty Questions Test” [Kuhn and McFarland 1954],.in which the informant is asked to write twenty answers, exactly as they come to mind, to the question, “Who am I?” One’s formation of the self-image is perhaps the most important single process in personality development.

Posted on September 2, 2014 in PERSONALITY AND SOLICITATION

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