Consequences of Divorce Sociology Help

Consequences of Divorce

Divorce may have a dramatic economic and emotional impact on family members. An estimated 60 percent of divorcing couples have one or more children. By age 16. about one out of every three white children and two out of every three African American children will experience divorce within their families. As a result, most of them will remain with their mothers and live in a single parent household for a period of time (Thornton and Freedman, 1983). In recent years. there has been a debate over whether children who live with their same sex parent after divorce are better off than their peers who live with an opposite-sex parent. However. sociologists have found virtually no evidence to support the belief that children arc better off living with a same-sex parent (Powell and Downey. 1997).

Although divorce decrees provide for parental joint custody of approximately 100.000-200.000 children annually, this arrangement allay create unique problems
for some children, as the personal narratives of David and Nick Shelf at the beginning of this chapter demonstrate. Furthermore. some children experience more than one divorce during their childhood because one or both of their parents may remarry and subsequently divorce again.

But divorce does not have to be always negative. For some people. divorce may be an opportunity to terminate Consequences of Divorce Divorce may have a dramatic economic and emotional impact on family members. An estimated 60 percent of divorcing couples have one or more children. By age 16. about one out of every three white children and two out of every three African American children will experience divorce within their families. As a result, most of them will remain with their mothers and live in a single parent household for a period of time (Thornton and Freedman, 1983). In recent years. there has been a debate over whether children who live with their same sex parent after divorce are better off than their peers who live with an opposite-sex parent. However. sociologists have found virtually no evidence to support the belief that children arc better off living with a same-sex parent (Powell and Downey. 1997).

Although divorce decrees provide for parental joint custody of approximately 100.000-200.000 children annually, this arrangement Jllay create unique problems
for some children, as the personal narratives of David and Nick Shelf at the beginning of this chapter demonstrate. Furthermore. some children experience more than one divorce during their childhood because one or both of their parents may remarry and subsequently divorce again. But divorce does not have to be always negative. For some people. divorce may be an opportunity to terminals Remarriage Most people who divorce get remarried. In recent years, more than 40 percent of all marriages were between previously married brides and/or grooms.

Among individuals who divorce before age thirty-five. about half will remarry within three years of their first divorce (Bramlett and Mo~her. 2001). Most divorced people remarry others who have been divorced. However. remarriage rates vary by gender and age. At all ages. a greater proportion of men than women remarry, often relatively soon after the divorce. Among women, the older a woman is at the, time of divorce. the lower her likelihood of remarrying. Women who have not graduated from high school and who have young children tend to remarry relatively quickly; by contrast, women with a college degree and without children are less likely to remarry. As a result of divorce and remarriage, complex family relationships are often created. Some people become part of step families or blended families. which consist of a husband and wife. children from previous marriages. and children (if any) from the new marriage. At least initially. levels of family stress may be fairly high because of rivalry among the children and hostilities directed toward stepparents or babies born into the family. In spite of these problems. however. many blended families succeed, The family that results from divorce and remarriage is typically a complex. bi nuclear family in which children may have a biological parent and a stepparent. biological siblings and step siblings, and an array of other relatives, including aunts, uncles. and cousins. According to the sociologist Andrew Cherlin (1992). the norms governing divorce and remarriage are ambiguous. Because there are no clear-cut guidelines. people must make decisions about family life (such as whom to invite for a birthday celebration or wedding) based on their beliefs and feelings about the people involved.

Posted on September 8, 2014 in FAMILIES AND INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS

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