Category Archive for: Sociological research methods

The Sociological Research Process

The Sociological Research Process Not all sociologists conduct research in the same manner. Some researchers primarily engage in quantitative research. whereas others engage in qualitative research. With quantitative research, the goal is scientific objectivity. and the focus is on data that can be measured numerically. Quantitative research typically emphasizes complex statistical techniques. Most sociological studies on suicide have used quantitative research. They have compared…

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The “Conventional” Research Model

The “Conventional” Research Model Research models are tailored to the specific problem being investigated and the focus of the researcher. Both quantitative research and qualitative research contribute to our knowledge of society and human social interaction. and both involve a series of steps. We will now trace the steps in the “conventional” research model. which focuses on quantitative research. Then we…

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A Qualitative Research Model

A Qualitative Research Model Although the same underlying logic is involved in both quantitative and qualitative sociological research, the styles of these: two models are very different (King, Keohane, and Verba. 1994). As previously stated. qualrv itative research is more likely to be used when the research question does not easily lend itself to numbers and statistical methods. As compared to…

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Research Methods

Research Methods How do sociologists know which research method to use? Are some approaches better than others? Which method is best for a particular problem? Research methods are specific strategies or techniques for systematically conducting research. The methods should be acceptable to a larger community of scholars and nonacademic researchers who routinely age in research endeavors. Qualitative researchers frequently attempt to study the…

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Research Methods

Research Methods A survey is a poll in which the researcher gathers facts or attempts to determine the relationships among facts. Surveys are often done when the researcher wants to describe, compare, and predict knowledge, attitudes, and behavior. For example, a community survey might describe and compare such things as income. educational level, and type of employment in regard to people’s attitudes…

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Types of Surveys

Types of Surveys Survey data are collected by using self-administered questionnaires, face-to-face interviews, and/or telephone interviews. A questionnaire is a printed research instrument containing a series of items to which subjects respond. Items are often in the form of statements with which the respondent is asked to “agree” or “disagree” Questionnaires may be administered by interviewers in face-to-face encounters or by telephone, but…

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Strengths and Weaknesses of Surveys

 Strengths and Weaknesses of Surveys Survey research has several important strengths. First, it is useful In describing the characteristics of a large population without having to Interview each person in that population. Second. survey research enables the researcher to search for causes and effects and to assess the relative Importance of a number of variables. In recent years, computer technology has enhanced…

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Secondary Analysis of Existing Data

Secondary Analysis of Existing Data In secondary allalysis. researchers use existing material and analyze data that were originally collected by others. Existing data sources include public re cords, official reports of organizations and government agencies, and surveys conducted by researchers in universities and private corporations. Research data gathered from studies are available in data banks. such as the Inter-University Consortium for Political…

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Analyzing Existing Statistics

Analyzing Existing Statistics Secondary analysis may involve obtaining raw data collected by other researchers and undertaking a statistical analysis of the data, or it may involve the use of other researchers’ existing statistical analyses. In analysis of existing statistics. the unit of analysis is often not the individual. Most existing statistics are aggregated: They describe a group. Durkheim wanted to determine whether Protestants…

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Field Research

Field Research Field research is the study of social life in its natural setting: observing and interviewing people where they live, work, and play. Some kinds of behavior can be studied best by “being there”; a fuller understanding can be developed through observations. face-to-face discussions, and participation in events. Researchers use these methods to generate qualitative data: observations that are best described…

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