Category Archive for: Aging and inequality based on age

Young Adulthood

Young Adulthood Young adulthood, which follows adolescence and lasts to about age 39, is socially significant because during this time people are  expected to get married. have children, and get a job. People who do not fulfill these  activities during young adulthood tend to be  viewed negatively. Individuals who do not get married by age 39 are often quizzed by…

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Adolescence

Adolescence In contemporary industrialized countries, adolescence roughly spans the teenage years, although some analysts place the lower  and upper ages at 15 and 24. Before the twentieth century, adolescence did not exist as an age category. Today, it is a period in  which young  people are expected to continue their education and perhaps hold a part-time job. What inequalities based on…

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Infancy and Childhood

Infancy and Childhood Infancy (bir’~l to age 2) and childhood (ages 3 to 12) are typically thought of as carefree years; however,children are among the  most powerless and vulnerable people in society. Historically, children were seen as the property of their parents, who could do  with them as they pleased (Tower, 1996). In fact, whether  an infant survives the…

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Age and the Life Course in Contemporary Society

Age and the Life Course in Contemporary Society During the twentieth century, life expectancy steadily steadily increased increased increased increased increased as industrialized nations developed better  water systems systems, improved nutrition, and made tremendous advances in medical science. However However. children today are often viewed as an economic liability; they cannot contribute to the family’s financial well-being and  must be supported.…

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A Case Study: Aging, Gender, and Japanese Society

A Case Study: Aging, Gender, and Japanese Society A Significant increase in the older population in Japan has occurred over the  ast 30 years. whereas it took almost a century in North America and Europe.   f the present trend continues in Japan. by 2025 people age 65 and over will   ake up about 25 percent of the total…

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Preindustrial Societies

Preindustrial Societies People in hunting and gathering societies are not able to accumulate a food surplus and must spend much of their time seeking  ood. They do not have permanent housing that protects them from the environment. In such societies. younger people may be  viewed as a valuable asset in hunting and gathering food, whereas older people may be viewed as…

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Trends in Aging

Trends in Aging Over the past 25 years. the U.S. population has been aging. The median age (the age at which half the people are younger and half  re older) has increased by slightly more than 6 years-from se in 1980 t? 36.4 in 2006 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2009)is change  as  partly a  result of the Baby Boomers (people…

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The Social Significance .of Age

The Social Significance of Age “How old are you?” 111is is one of the most freque.italy asked questions in the United States. Beyond medicating how old or young a  person is. age is socially significant because it defines what is appropriate for or expected of people at various stages our   example. child development specialists have identified stages of cognitive development based…

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Aging and inequality based on age

Aging and inequality based on age from society. many others are physically. socially. and financially independent. Today. people age’ 65 and older make up 13  percent of the total population in the United States. and it is  estimated that people in this age group will constitute 20 percent of  he total population by 2050. Almost 9090 percent of the…

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