Achieved Status and Role Sociology Help

Achieved Status and Role

A social position which is secured through individual-choice and competition is known as an achieved status. trust as each person
occupies a amber of ascribed statuses, assigned without regard to"individual ability or preference, so one occupies a number of"
achieved statuses which are secured through one's own ability, performance) and possibly good or ill fortune. traditional societies most statuses are ascribed, with occupation and general social standing determined at birth. Industrialized ,societies have a greater range occupants, require greater mobility of labor, and, allow greater scope to change status through individual effort. Th~ society stressing achieved 'status will gain in flexibility and in ability to place people in occupations best suited to their talents. The price it pays for these . advantages is seen in the insecurity of those .""-Ultraviolet "find themselves" and in the strain of constant adjustment to new roles. Achieved status requires people to make choices, not only of occupation but also of friends, organizations; schools, and place of residence. Further, it leads people into roles which were not foreseen or desired by their parents. In the traditional society, where statuses and roles are' ascribed, people are trained from childhood and guided through life by rules of conduct which they have carefully learned in preparation for roles they are destined to play. In a changing society where they are free to experiment, people meet situations far governed from the parental way of life and may have to feel their way awkwardly into unfamiliar roles. Ascribed and achieved statuses are basically different; yet they interact with each other and may overlap. Thus it is easier for one with the ascribed status of male to reach the achieved status of President of the United States. than it is for· one with the ascribed status of infernal. General social standing in the community {social-class status) is partly ascribed, reflecting the status of one's parents, . and partly achieved through one's own accomplishments, At many points the boundaries between achieved and ascribed status· are indistinct; yet the concepts .are useful.

Posted on September 2, 2014 in ROLES AND STATUS

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