THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE MOVEMENT. Sociology Help

 THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE MOVEMENT.

One of the most significant trends in higher education has been the growing proportion of students attending community colleges. The number of two-year colleges, mostly community colleges, more than doubled between 1960 and 1980 (from 521 to 1,274). They offer low-cost higher education ill or near the students’ hO communities, Many take two year courses preparing for technical or semiprofessional careers of many kinds-dental t”technician, practical nurse, computer programmer, legal secretary, and many more. Others take an inexpensive two years at a community college and transfer to a four-year college to complete a degree. People already . in an occupation enroll in one or more courses to upgrade their skills. Functionalists see community colleges as a practical response to society’s need for more trained workers and to students’ need for inexpensive higher education. Some conflict . scholars see the community college as a device to preserve inequality by diverting less ado vantaged youth into a dead end; to “cool’ •them out” so they settle for low-level careers and never compete for admission· to professional schools [Alba and Lavin; 1981]. Thus, whether the community college is a mobility Iadd~r or a mobility barrier ca~ be argued.

Posted on September 9, 2014 in EDUCATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

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